nostalgerie:

Deux femmes chaouia dans l’Aurés - 1921

nostalgerie:

Deux femmes chaouia dans l’Aurés - 1921

Ethnic jewellery and adornment London Spitalfields Antique market (at Old Spitalfields Market)

Ethnic jewellery and adornment London Spitalfields Antique market (at Old Spitalfields Market)

I shall be showing at GLUE - Chart Gallery, Chelsea 13 Feb - Sun 9 March 2014The CHART GALLERY PRESENTS






Michal Cole, Cordelia Donohoe, David Ferry, Mark Harris,KEELERTORN…View Post

I shall be showing at GLUE - Chart Gallery, Chelsea 13 Feb - Sun 9 March 2014

The CHART GALLERY PRESENTS

Michal Cole, Cordelia Donohoe, David Ferry, Mark Harris,
KEELERTORN…

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First night at the Courtauld Biennial opening and The Veil Hats in response to my work      jewellery courtesy of http://AzulTribe.com View Post

First night at the Courtauld Biennial opening and The Veil Hats in response to my work

      jewellery courtesy of http://AzulTribe.com 

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gacougnol:

Gabor Kasza “Elements 19”

gacougnol:

Gabor Kasza
“Elements 19”

(via les-sources-du-nil)

Preparing for the Courtauld show Alicia Stockley one of the organisers, looking pink!
Adjusting picsView Post

Preparing for the Courtauld show

 Alicia Stockley one of the organisers, looking pink!

Adjusting pics

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The Milliner Leo Carlton makes a ‘veil’ hat for my work at the Courtauld Biennial 24th JanLeo making a ‘veil’ hat                                                                           …View Post

The Milliner Leo Carlton makes a ‘veil’ hat for my work at the Courtauld Biennial 24th Jan

Leo making a ‘veil’ hat                                                  

                         …

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Im in a group show at Blacks Members Club Jan 22nd-April 9th 2014 BLACKS MEMBERS CLUB
S A L O N  H Y S T É R I Q U E: LA PETIT MORT ET LA GRANDE HYSTÉRIE  View Post

Im in a group show at Blacks Members Club Jan 22nd-April 9th 2014

 BLACKS MEMBERS CLUB

S A L O N  H Y S T É R I Q U E: LA PETIT MORT ET LA GRANDE HYSTÉRIE  

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The Courtauld Biennial 24th Jan 2014

I shall be showing a selection of my veil works at the Courtauld Biennial, London

Please join the curators, artists, and volunteers of The Courtauld Institute of Art’s East Wing Biennial to celebrate the opening of the 2014-2015 exhibition – INTERA…

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Fab interview with Shirin Neshat

thenewinquiry:

imageShirin Neshat Speechless (1996) via Gladstone Gallery

By 

I’ve been following Shirin Neshat’s work for a long time. Initially, it wasn’t by choice: her Women of Allah series was unavoidable. Black and white, clearly confrontational, the images were everywhere, and helped turn the art market towards Iran and its women, and her progression into video art, films always came with admirers and detractors. Neshat was in London for some events, including a workshop and the London Film School as well as a double interview with Isaac Julien at the Barbican. We met over a glass of wine (for her) and an espresso martini (for me), to discuss her latest film with Natalie Portman, the politics of art, and homework.

Tara Aghdashloo: How has your understanding of your background and relationship to your subject matter – which is often Iran – evolved over the years?

Shirin Neshat: The development of the ideas of my work started from the personal to more social, and back to personal. It always relies on where I’m at in my life. To me art is about framing questions. Questions that are really important to the artist. What you question has to do with you and what you struggle with as a human being. These could be existential, political, or things that are from the unknown.

The evolution of my subject and my work reflects the way I navigate in life. If my father dies I think about death, and I make a work about death, like Passage (2001) that I made with Philip Glass. If I’m trying to return to Iran, around 1993-1997, and reconnect with it, then I make Women of Allah, which is a kind of nostalgic point of view of an artist living abroad. When I want to have a sharp knife and be critical about the government, then I make The Last Word, which is a trial. It’s a little bit like music. The artist goes up and down according to the melody and the emotions that drive them to do what they do.

TA: Do you think art is always political, even if you don’t want it to be?

SN: You could say for an Iranian art is always political. And you could say that about Andy Warhol maybe, but I don’t know. If you look at contemporary art and the likes of Jeff Koons or Damien Hirst, it’s not political art. It’s actually very narcissistic and it is the artists’ interest in their own ego. Which a commentary about their own culture whether it’s American culture or Western culture as a whole. If you look at Iranian culture then yes, I could say that every Iranian artist, however they work, somehow it becomes political. Even if they paint flowers it’s political because they are making an effort to move away from the political, and that is a political act.

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